Workplace IAQ

Oregon Institute of Occupational Health Sciences Featured Resources provide the latest information on workplace safety, health and well-being. Additional information can be filtered by topic in the supporting navigation to the left of the article content.

  • Date
  • Type
  • Title
Jul 11, 2019
Dampness and Mold Assessment Tool General Buildings

https://www.cdc.gov/niosh/docs/2019-115/pdfs/2019-115.pdf

NIOSH developed this tool to help assess areas of dampness in buildings and to help prioritize remediation of problems areas, and as a way to attempt to prevent the development of mold.

Source: NIOSH

Jul 11, 2019
Dampness and Mold Assessment Tool School Buildings

https://www.cdc.gov/niosh/docs/2019-114/pdfs/2019-114-508.pdf?id=10.26616/NIOSHPUB2019114

NIOSH developed this tool to help assess areas of dampness in buildings and to help prioritize remediation of problems areas, and as a way to attempt to prevent the development of mold.

Source: NIOSH

Sep 04, 2018
OSHA Safety and Health Topic: Legionellosis (Legionnaires' Disease and Pontiac Fever)

https://www.osha.gov/SLTC/legionnairesdisease/index.html

Legionnaires’ disease and Pontiac Fever are collectively known as Legionellosis, a disease caused by Legionella bacteria. This topic page provides information on the disease and how to prevent its occurrence in the workplace.

Source: OSHA

Jan 21, 2017
OSHA Safety and Health Topic: Molds and Fungi

https://www.osha.gov/SLTC/molds/

Molds are fungi that are found everywhere – both indoors and outdoors all year round. The terms fungi and mold are often used interchangeably, but mold is actually a type of fungi. Concern about indoor exposure to mold has increased along with public awareness that exposure to mold can cause a variety of adverse health effects.

Source: OSHA

Dec 01, 2015
Green office environments linked with higher cognitive function scores

http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/news/press-releases/green-office-environments-linked-with-higher-cognitive-function-scores/

A new study from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health’s Center for Health and the Global Environment, SUNY Upstate Medical University, and Syracuse University addresses how "green" office environments may be linked with higher cognition.

Source: Harvard School of Public Health

May 01, 2015
Fragrances Can Cause or Trigger Work-related Asthma

http://us5.campaign-archive1.com/?u=4586a1ad0b7ecd671f7295e07&id=3d92295427&e=9eef1dd31a

The Work-Related Asthma Prevention Program (WRAPP) of the California Department of Public Health is releasing new fact sheets on fragrances and work-related asthma for May, Asthma Awareness Month.

Source: CDPH

Feb 01, 2013
Preventing worker illness from indoor pesticide exposure

http://cdph.ca.gov/programs/ohsep/Pages/IndoorPest.aspx

California Department of Public Health, Occupational Health Branch offers fact sheets and other educational materials about indoor pesticide use

Source: CDPH

Dec 01, 2012
NIOSH Alert: Preventing Occupational Respiratory Disease from Exposures Caused by Dampness in Office Buildings, Schools, and Other Nonindustrial Buildings

http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/docs/2013-102/

Office buildings, schools, and other nonindustrial buildings may develop moisture and dampness problems from roof and window leaks, high indoor humidity, and flooding events, among other things. For this Alert, we define "dampness" as the presence of unwanted and excessive moisture in buildings [AIHA 2008].

Source: NIOSH

Oct 01, 2011
Office Environment and Worker Safety & Health

http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/officeenvironment/?s_cid=3ni7d2fb101120110330pm

Maintaining a healthy office environment requires attention to chemical hazards, equipment and work station design, physical environment (temperature, humidity, light, noise, ventilation, and space), task design, psychological factors (personal interactions, work pace, job control) and sometimes, chemical or other environmental exposures.

Source: NIOSH

Jun 01, 2011
IAQ in Large Buildings: Building Assessment Survey and Evaluation (BASE) Study

http://www.epa.gov/iaq/base/

EPA conducted the Building Assessment Survey and Evaluation (BASE) study. The BASE study used a standardized protocol to collect extensive indoor air quality data from one hundred randomly selected public and commercial office buildings in thirty-seven cities and twenty-five states.

Source: EPA